Gizmos Calorimetry Lab Answers

Posted on

Those who are looking for the answers of the Gizmo Calorimetry Lab can find everything here. All the correct answers are in bold. Make sure to learn everything well so that you will be able to get a good result in the test.

Prior Knowledge Questions

  1. The Latin word calor means “heat,” and meter comes from the Greek word meaning “to measure.” What do you think a calorimeter does?
    Measuring the heat of chemical reactions or physical changes as well as heat capacity
  2. Where have you heard the word calorie before? What do you think a calorie is?
    Calorie, a unit of energy or heat variously defined. The calorie was originally defined as the amount of heat required at a pressure of 1 standard atmosphere to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water 1 degree celsius

Gizmo Warm-up

  1. On the SIMULATION pane, select Copper. Use the slider to set its Mass to 200 g. Set the Water mass to200 g. Check that the Water temp is set to 30.0 °C and the copper’s Temp is 90 °C. Select the GRAPH tab, and click Play.
    A. What was the Final temperature of the copper and the water? 34.96
    B. How much did the temperature of the copper change? Down 55.04
    C. How much did the temperature of the water change? Down 165.0
  2. Specific heat capacity can be described as a substance’s resistance to temperature changes. Which substance has a greater specific heat capacity, copper or water? Explain.

Water has a higher specific heat capacity because it has less of a tendency to change in temperature. Copper with a temperature of 60 degrees celsius. And the same mass as that of the water in which it was placed, cooled off to 23.4 degrees celsius.

Activity A: Heat transfer

Question: What factors determine how heat energy transfers between objects?

  1. Predict: In the Gizmo warm-up, you saw how 200 g of 90 °C copper transfers heat to 200 g of 30.0 °C water.
    A. How do you think increasing the water’s mass would affect the final temperature? The larger the amount of water, the higher the heat capacity
    B. How do you think decreasing the copper’s mass would affect the final temperature? Decreasing the temperature of the copper made the final temperature decrease.
    C. How do you think increasing or decreasing the copper’s initial temperature would affect the final temperature? The amount that the water’s temperature increaSes depends on the mass of the water and the amount of heat energy in the copper.
  2. Collect data: Use the Gizmo to determine the final temperature for each set-up listed below. Record your results in the tables. In the first table, you experiment with changing the water’s mass. In the second table, you change the copper’s mass. In the third table, you change the initial temperature of the copper. The first row of each table has been completed for you.
    What factors determine how heat energy transfers between objects
  3. Analyze: For each factor listed in the chart below, explain how the final temperature was changed and why you think that change occurred.
    A. What was the effect of increasing the water’s mass? Decreases
    B. What was the effect of decreasing the copper’s mass? Decreases to the same amount as water mass
    C. What was the effect of changing the initial temperature of the copper? It decreased
  4. Draw conclusions: The amount that the water’s temperature increases depends on the mass of the water and the amount of heat energy in the copper.
    A. How does changing the initial mass of the copper affect how much heat energy it has? The more copper, the more heat energy
    B. How does changing the initial temperature of the copper affect how much heat energy it has? The higher temperature, the more heat energy
  5. Apply: Many gyms and health clubs have steam saunas, which are small steam-filled rooms. Traditionally, steam saunas have a container of heated rocks. A small ladle of water is poured on the rocks in order to make the steam.
    A. Use what you have learned so far about heat transfer to explain how hot rocks can be used to make steam? When the water comes in contact with the hot rocks the heat energy of the rocks is transferred to the water causing it to become steam.
    B. Why do you think only a small ladle-full of water is poured on the rocks at one time
    The heat vaporization of water is very high with small amounts of water. You can vaporize the water as it hits the rocks into steam.

Activity B: Specific heat

Question: How can you compare the specific heat capacities of various substances?

  1. Explain: How do you think you can use the calorimeter to compare the specific heat capacities of the substances listed on the Gizmo? You can compare how much different substances will heat up the water in the calorimeter.
  2. Predict: Which substance do you think will have the highest specific heat capacity? Why? 39.35ºC40.59ºC Granite had the greatest change in water temperature showing the specific heat is higher than copper and lead. Granite, copper, lead gives you the high and low specific heat energy.
  3. Experiment: Use the Gizmo to determine the final temperature for each set-up listed below. Record your results in the table. The first row has been completed for you.
    How can you compare the specific heat capacities of various substances
  4. Analyze: Of the three substances, which caused the largest temperature change in the water? What does this indicate about its relative specific heat capacity? Granite
  5. Interpret: Remember that specific heat capacity is a measure of a substance’s resistance to temperature change. The more resistant a substance is to temperature change, the higher is its specific heat capacity.
    Rank the three substances in order of their specific heat capacities, from highest to lowest.
    Granite, copper, lead
  6. Predict: How do you think the specific heat capacity of ice will compare to that of copper, granite, and lead? Less
  7. Experiment: Deselect Lead, and select Ice. Use the default values for Temp (-30 °C) and Mass (50 g). Set the Water temp to 60 °C and the Water mass to 200 g. Click Play.
    A. What was the final temperature? 28.83
    B. What do you think is happening when the ice line on the graph is at 0 °C for a long period of time? Why do you think the line disappears after that? Evaporates
    C. How much of a temperature change did the water experience? It went down then stayed the same.
    D. How does this change in the water’s temperature compare to the change caused by the other substances you tested? The two lines don’t meet
  8. Extend your thinking: A lot of energy is needed to heat a substance with a high specific heat capacity. However, even more energy is needed to cause a phase change (such as the melting of ice). Click Reset. Set the ice’s Temp to -100 °C and its Mass to 50 g. Set the Water temp to 50 °C and Water mass to 200 g. Click Play.
    A. What was the final temperature? 13.39
    B. Do you think all the ice melted? Explain. Yes because it is way above 0
    C. Look at the GRAPH. The graph shows two separate stages: the heating of the ice and then the melting of the ice. How much did the water’s temperature change while the ice was heating? How much did it change while the ice was melting? The amount between the two is about 15
    A. How did this experiment demonstrate ice’s high specific heat capacity? The heating of the ice and then the melting of the ice. How much the temperature changes while the ice.

If you want to find the answer key of the Activity C: Calculating specific heat, go to link here.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.