CommonLit Answers Key

Posted on

You may be looking for the Answers Key for CommonLit because you need it for your learning. When I tried to find the information about CommonLit answers keys, there are some websites which provide it and one of them is Answer Key Weeks 7 and 8 English 9th and 10th Desoto County Schools as you are able to see below according to the content.schoolinsites.com.

Here are the answers keys for CommonLit Story of An Hour.

  1. PART A; Which of the following best describes a major theme of the text?

a. Men and women should be equal, but they are too different to get along properly.
b. Death can be unexpected and can cause anyone to feel sorrow, even for someone they did not love.
c. True happiness comes from within rather than from circumstances outside of one’s control.
d. Newfound independence can bring the promise of freedom and happiness into a person’s life.
Answer: D.  Newfound independence can bring the promise of freedom and happiness into a person’s life.

  1. PARTS: Which of the following quotes best supports the answer to Part A?

a. “But now there was a dull stare in her eyes… It was not a glance of reflection, but rather indicated a suspension of intelligent thought.” (Paragraph 8)
b. “There would be no one to live for during those coming years; she would live for herself. There would be no powerful will bending hers” (Paragraph 12)
c. “And yet she had loved him – sometimes. Often she had not. What did it matter!” (Paragraph 13)
d. “There was a feverish triumph in her eyes, and she carried herself unwittingly like a goddess of Victory.” (Paragraph 18)
Answer: B. “There would be no one to live for during those coming years; she would live for herself. There would be no powerful will bending hers” (Paragraph 12)

  1. How does the news of her husband’s death affect Mrs. Mallard?

a. She is at first overcome with grief, but soon she realizes that his death will allow her to lead an independent life.
b. She pretends to mourn her husband, but she is privately happy to rid herself of the man whom she never loved.
c. She is physically upset by the news, and this distress triggers her heart condition and kills her.
d. She is at first happy to hear that he is dead, but she comes to realize that she will still miss him.
Answer: A. She is at first overcome with grief, but soon she realizes that his death will allow her to lead an independent life.

  1. What do paragraphs 15-16 reveal about Josephine’s and Louise’s different points of view in the passage?

a. Josephine misunderstands Louise and believes she is sick with grief, but in reality, Louise feels freed by her husband’s death.
b. Josephine believes that Louise is too frail to be left alone, but Louise knows that she is healthier than everyone believes her to be.
c. Josephine worries that Louise’s imagination is worsening her heart condition, but Louise is too distracted by her fantasies to notice her erratic heart rate.
d. Josephine cannot understand why Louise wants to be alone while grieving, but Louise actually wants to be alone to celebrate the death of her husband.
Answer: A. Josephine misunderstands Louise and believes she is sick with grief, but in reality, Louise feels freed by her husband’s death.

  1. How does Mrs. Mallard’s death in the conclusion contribute to the story’s overall meaning? Cite evidence in your answer.

Answers will vary; students should discuss how the revelation that Mr. Mallard is alive causes Mrs. Mallard’s death, which ironically prevents her from leading the free life she wanted. Mrs. Mallard’s death at the end of the story is ironic in a couple of ways. First, there was initially great care taken to protect her and her “heart trouble” when the news of her husband’s death was revealed (Paragraph 1). This care does little to save her later when Mr. Mallard shows up alive. Secondly, Mrs. Mallard dies just after gaining a desire to live fully and for herself. Students should address the irony in the final line of the story in their discussion: “When the doctors came they said she had died of heart disease-of the joy that kills” (Paragraph 20). This final line can have multiple interpretations. This “joy” may refer to Mrs. Mallard’s newfound joy for life, which may have been so strong that it triggered her heart troubles. The text implies that the other characters believe it was the joy of seeing her husband alive that killed Mrs. Mallard; after all, “she had loved him – sometimes” (Paragraph 13). However, the reader knows that Mrs. Mallard was shocked but likely not overjoyed to see her husband still living, as she had just been happily imagining her life without him. Mrs. Mallard’s death suggests that freedom is a powerful feeling that should be appreciated and cherished, but it is not so easy to hold on to.

And here is the answer key for CommonLit Mending Wall.

  1. Explain how the speaker’s point of view shifts throughout the poem. Cite evidence from the poem in your response.

Answers will vary; students should describe the speaker’s point of view and how it shifts throughout the poem. The poem begins with an ambiguous “Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,” and for the first several lines the speaker is fixated on the mysterious reasons for its dismantling – “the frozen-groundswell,” the “work of hunters,” etc. with only a brief mention of his attempts to keep the wall intact: “I have come after them and made repair” (line 6). In line 12 we learn that the speaker initiates the mending of the wall with his neighbor, suggesting that either the wall is something he values having, or that perhaps he enjoys the company of his neighbor during mending time. The actual act of mending evokes a playful tone as the speaker describes the process of resetting the stones, likening it even to a “just another kind of outdoor game.” Then, quite suddenly, there is a change in point of view in the middle of the poem at line 23, at which point the speaker quite suddenly remarks that “we do not need the wall.” Perhaps he has come to an epiphany that the wall is unnecessary, or perhaps he has suspected this all along (one could argue that he may be the “Something there is that doesn’t love a wall” from the very first line). He begins by suggesting to his neighbor the rationality for why a wall is not needed,and is met with a trite platitude: “Good fences make good neighbors.” The speaker further explores this expression, which we learned the neighbor picked up from his father, and the speaker cements his opinion that a wall should have a real purpose.

  1. PART A: Which TWO of the following best identify the central themes of this poem?

a. Human connection
b. The importance of boundaries
c. Violence and war
d. Familial love
e. Questioning the status quo
f. The indifference of nature
Answer: A. Human connection and E. Questioning the status quo

  1. PART B: Which TWO phrases from the text best support the answers to Part A?

a. “And makes gaps even two can pass abreast.” (Line 4)
b. “There where it is we do not need the wall: / He is all pine and I am apple orchard.” (Lines 23-24)
c. “‘Good fences make good neighbors.'” (Line 27)
d. “Spring is the mischief in me, and I wonder / If I could put a notion in his head” (Lines 28-29)
e. “Before I built a wall I’d ask to know/What I was walling in or walling out,/And to whom I was like to give offense.” (Lines 32-34)
f. “He moves in darkness as it seems to me, / Not of woods only and the shade of trees.” (Lines 41-42)
Answer: B. “There where it is we do not need the wall: / He is all pine and I am apple orchard.” (Lines 23-24) and E. “Before I built a wall I’d ask to know/What I was walling in or walling out,/And to whom I was like to give offense.” (Lines 32-34)

  1. PART A: What does the word “spell” most closely mean as it is used in line 18?

a. Command
b. Hex
c. Moment
d. Fascination
Answer: A. Command

  1. PART B: Which phrase from the text best supports the answer to Part A?

a. “To each the boulders that have fallen to each” (Line 16)
b. “And some are loaves and some so nearly balls” (Line 17)
c. “to make them balance” (Line 18)
d. ”Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'”(Line 19)
Answer: D. “‘Stay where you are until our backs are turned!'”(Line 19)

  1. How does the poem’s form relate to its meaning? Cite evidence from the poem in your response.

Answers will vary; students may discuss the poet’s loose usage of iambic pentameter, which conveys a methodic yet relaxed tone, mirroring the speaker’s actions and mood. Students may also mention the shape of the poem, which, on its side, looks similar to a dilapidated rock wall. Other relevant answers could include the lack of rhyme scheme, which conveys a more conversational tone as if the speaker is speaking in stream-of-consciousness, or the repetition of certain key phrases, such as “Something there is that doesn’t love a wall” and “Good fences make good neighbors,” which emphasizes the two disparate points of view in the poem.

It is important for you to note that this answer key is just for your learning, not for cheating.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.